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How do they make Pink Champagne?

pinkchampagne
In the past, pink champagne has often been considered inferior to the white variety. However, pink champagne, or rose, has been going through something of a revival in the past few years. If white champagne is seen as a celebratory drink, then pink champagne is sometimes seen as a celebration of romance. Turning white champagne into pink champagne comes down to one crucial part of the winemaking process.

There are only two ways that pink champagne becomes pink. One method is to add red wine to the white wine. This is the slightly easier method, and the depth of color of the red wine is up to the winemaker’s preference. It can vary from a slight pinkish color to a dark red. The red wine used in the mix should be from the same area as the original white champagne.

The other method used to make champagne pink is slightly more complex and takes place while the wine is still in the vat. Traditional champagnes are made by mixing two-thirds black grape with one third white grape. After the grapes have been pressed, the skins of the black grapes can be left in with the white wine. This in effect dyes the wine red and produces pink champagne.

This process is still used today to make pink champagne, but it is not as popular or widely used as the first method. This is because the dying process is quite tricky to control. However, some people prefer leaving the black grape skins in to soak, as it gives the champagne a full-bodied flavor.

Only three different varieties of grape are used in the champagne making process: the white variety called Chardonay, and the two red varieties known as Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier. The sweetness or dryness of the champagne is determined by the amount of sugar added after the wine has fermented.

There are many different brands and types of pink champagne, but there is really only one true champagne. Real champagne is so called because it comes from an area in France called Champagne. Champagne is situated northeast of Paris. Wine experts insist that only champagne from this area can be considered true champagne.

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Wednesday, July 23, 8:07 pm

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